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Tom Davenport

Tom Davenport is a creative digital marketer who develops content and digital experiences for brands.

  • July 31, 2012 6:58 pm

    Ignore Ive. In 2008, Apple said it’s in this for the money

    Jonathan Ive is widely credited with being the design genius who helped turn Apple’s fortunes around in the late 1990s. 

    As a propagandist, he’s underrated.

    Today Wired UK posted comments from Ive on how Apple’s goal is not to make money, but to make good products. This would only be a fair comment for a design-centric company like Apple to make if it hadn’t explicitly gone on record to say the opposite.

    In 2008 music publishers were pressing for a 66% increase in digital royalty rates. Eddy Cue promptly stamped out their collective effort with this comment:

    "If the [iTunes music store] was forced to absorb any increase in the … royalty rate, the result would be to significantly increase the likelihood of the store operating at a financial loss - which is no alternative at all. Apple has repeatedly made it clear that it is in this business to make money, and most likely would not continue to operate [the iTunes music store] if it were no longer possible to do so profitably.”

    You could argue that Cue was specifically talking about why Apple was in the music business rather than discussing it’s wider product line. But then you’d have to swear to never to mention how Apple’s software and hardware is a tightly integrated product.

    Sometimes I wonder if Ive has become just another product to wheel out as part Apple’s propaganda machine, but he’s running the risk of becoming a parody. I hope not, because nothing could be worse for Apple than seeing its poster boy fall so far from grace.

  • February 10, 2012 11:40 am

    Spotify pays more than 1p per stream - sometimes

    Spotify receives a lot of bad press for its tiny streaming royalties.

    At the last #sonicmeet, I told a skeptical Mike Hillier that Vienna Circle, a band whose second album I have been producing, have seen streaming payments in the pennies before. Sure, it’s no flattering payment, but it certainly looks better than the £0.000125 that many artists receive per play.

    I just received an updated copy of Vienna Circle’s digital stats, and checked back to see if I was utterly mistaken that Spotify, or indeed another streaming service, really can pay more than the hallowed penny for a single track stream.

    If it can, then suddenly streaming becomes a reasonably viable platform for the long term.

    Read More

  • May 25, 2011 11:07 am
    4,195 Reasons You’re Wasting Your Time With Google Music
Music Ally detailed the research in their excellent daily mail-out:
Mobile music firm Music WithMe has been helping people transfer their iTunes libraries to non-Apple devices for three years now, which the company says gives it a good viewpoint on how people are using their digital music. And? “We ran some analysis on our anonymous user data and discovered that, on average, 81% of a user’s library has never been played in iTunes. Ever,” co-founder Jeff Fedor tells Music Ally. The company also says the average iTunes library has 5,409 songs, of which 4,195 have never been played (and thus 1,214 have been). A useful stat to know, given the fact that many current cloud storage services require every track to be uploaded.  View high resolution

    4,195 Reasons You’re Wasting Your Time With Google Music

    Music Ally detailed the research in their excellent daily mail-out:

    Mobile music firm Music WithMe has been helping people transfer their iTunes libraries to non-Apple devices for three years now, which the company says gives it a good viewpoint on how people are using their digital music. And? “We ran some analysis on our anonymous user data and discovered that, on average, 81% of a user’s library has never been played in iTunes. Ever,” co-founder Jeff Fedor tells Music Ally. The company also says the average iTunes library has 5,409 songs, of which 4,195 have never been played (and thus 1,214 have been). A useful stat to know, given the fact that many current cloud storage services require every track to be uploaded. 

  • May 2, 2011 7:40 pm
    thebangersbiz:

BMW + Pandora
All 2011 + 2012 models will feature the capability to control your iPhone’s Pandora app via the car’s dashboard and audio system. Love this iPhone to dashbboard control approach - think about how this will affect Spotify / iTunes cloud in your whip. From Ubergizmo
View high resolution

    thebangersbiz:

    BMW + Pandora

    All 2011 + 2012 models will feature the capability to control your iPhone’s Pandora app via the car’s dashboard and audio system. Love this iPhone to dashbboard control approach - think about how this will affect Spotify / iTunes cloud in your whip. From Ubergizmo

  • February 23, 2011 8:24 pm

    The Impending 24-bit Audio Con

    There’s been some heavy discussions between engineers on twitter about the reports that consumers will be sold 24-bit audio. While on one hand we should be applauding any steps towards better quality music markets, it seems the consensus is that we want regular 16-bit, 44.1khz (or, CD quality) audio on iTunes. 24-bit, while with significant benefits in a studio, do not present a notable benefit to the end listener. This is certainly debatable, but considering the market who can tell the difference will be so small, it feels like dirty work at play.

    Call me a cynic, but the 24-bit concept is being pushed around by the makers of the Dr Dre Beats headphones, where Dre is business partners with the CEO of Interscope. On the surface, it looks like consumers can expect an industry-wide duping that they need HD audio, and to buy the MP3 players that can support it and the headphones or speakers that can reproduce it.

    Part of me thinks I’m being hasty. I want people to appreciate good quality audio, and it’s a step in the right direction from the industry. But a more important issue is the loudness culture.

    I wish there was an industry-wide move that suggesting branding well-mixed, dynamic music as HDR Audio. The average consumer doesn’t need to know what it means to see that there’s something HD about the music, and it adds genuine value to the listening experience. We’ll have to see if the message will get out on Dynamic Range Day.

    Anyway. To get to the point, you can see my organised tirade on the matter on Gizmodo.

    Update: In response to Gizmodo commenters, when I say “[Dr. Dre] has offered his Beats headphones to audiophiles for some years,” I don’t mean to qualify them as audiophile-worthy headphones, just that they are marketed as such. I’ve never heard his headphones.