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Tom Davenport

Tom Davenport is a creative digital marketer who develops content and digital experiences for technology and music brands.

1/5 of We Make Awesome Sh.

  • February 18, 2013 3:02 pm

    Jonathan Ive on on how Apple names its products

    I’ve found an extra clip from Jonathan Ive’s appearance on beloved British children’s programme Blue Peter, which you can see below.

    He discusses how Apple approaches naming new products, and the psychological effect that those names can have on the design process. Barney asks how Ive would approach designing a lunchbox. His reply:

    "If we’re thinking of lunchbox, we’d be really careful about not having the word ‘box’ already give you  bunch of ideas that could be quite narrow. You think of a box being a square, and like a cube. And so we’re quite careful with the words we use, because those can determine the path that you go down."

    I found it on the iPlayer stream of the original blue Peter episode. It looks like the official BBC clip which did the rounds on mac news sites last week was an edited version which cut this out. A shame really, because this was the most insightful part, though I thought it was great to see how humble Ive was while being presented with his gold Blue Peter badge.

    Here’s the full original segment where Ive gives extra feedback on work submitted by young designers:

    Notice how Ive reacts to a design with a smart wristwatch… perhaps one day his smile will prove telling.

  • July 31, 2012 6:58 pm

    Ignore Ive. In 2008, Apple said it’s in this for the money

    Jonathan Ive is widely credited with being the design genius who helped turn Apple’s fortunes around in the late 1990s. 

    As a propagandist, he’s underrated.

    Today Wired UK posted comments from Ive on how Apple’s goal is not to make money, but to make good products. This would only be a fair comment for a design-centric company like Apple to make if it hadn’t explicitly gone on record to say the opposite.

    In 2008 music publishers were pressing for a 66% increase in digital royalty rates. Eddy Cue promptly stamped out their collective effort with this comment:

    "If the [iTunes music store] was forced to absorb any increase in the … royalty rate, the result would be to significantly increase the likelihood of the store operating at a financial loss - which is no alternative at all. Apple has repeatedly made it clear that it is in this business to make money, and most likely would not continue to operate [the iTunes music store] if it were no longer possible to do so profitably.”

    You could argue that Cue was specifically talking about why Apple was in the music business rather than discussing it’s wider product line. But then you’d have to swear to never to mention how Apple’s software and hardware is a tightly integrated product.

    Sometimes I wonder if Ive has become just another product to wheel out as part Apple’s propaganda machine, but he’s running the risk of becoming a parody. I hope not, because nothing could be worse for Apple than seeing its poster boy fall so far from grace.

  • February 29, 2012 5:01 pm

    Apple probably wants HD-AAC for iTunes Match

    Yesterday I reported in the Guardian on Apple’s plans to upgrade its iTunes Match library to offer “adaptive streaming”.The theory is, anything you re-download (or stream?) from iTunes Match will be at the best quality available for your device or connection speed.

    Now I think Apple is seriously considering HD-AAC as the file format to deliver this service. 

    Read More

  • February 10, 2012 11:40 am

    Spotify pays more than 1p per stream - sometimes

    Spotify receives a lot of bad press for its tiny streaming royalties.

    At the last #sonicmeet, I told a skeptical Mike Hillier that Vienna Circle, a band whose second album I have been producing, have seen streaming payments in the pennies before. Sure, it’s no flattering payment, but it certainly looks better than the £0.000125 that many artists receive per play.

    I just received an updated copy of Vienna Circle’s digital stats, and checked back to see if I was utterly mistaken that Spotify, or indeed another streaming service, really can pay more than the hallowed penny for a single track stream.

    If it can, then suddenly streaming becomes a reasonably viable platform for the long term.

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  • October 7, 2011 12:12 pm
    The 19 year old student who designed that iconic Apple logo with a sillouette of Steve Jobs has reacted to his art being shared the world over following Jobs’ death.
jmak:

The emails, the interviews, the well wishes.
None of that compare to the fact that my design has reached 180000 people. I’m very glad that it has struck a chord in so many people’s hearts, and it’s a true testament to Steve’s influence and accomplishments.
I am so overwhelmed with work right now that I don’t even have the time to type out a proper post.
So thank you.
?
P.S. I’ll do a follow-up post shortly dealing with questions about the usage of my design.
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    The 19 year old student who designed that iconic Apple logo with a sillouette of Steve Jobs has reacted to his art being shared the world over following Jobs’ death.

    jmak:

    The emails, the interviews, the well wishes.

    None of that compare to the fact that my design has reached 180000 people. I’m very glad that it has struck a chord in so many people’s hearts, and it’s a true testament to Steve’s influence and accomplishments.

    I am so overwhelmed with work right now that I don’t even have the time to type out a proper post.

    So thank you.

    ?

    P.S. I’ll do a follow-up post shortly dealing with questions about the usage of my design.